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Static Fire Stories Articles & Technical Papers Current News

Approved Test Procedures - AT# G1000/August 1998

Gloves

1. Purpose

1.1 The purpose of this test procedure is to determine the electrical resistance and relative static charging propensity of gloves used for ESD control applications.

1.2 It is not the purpose of this test procedure to set standards of acceptance.

2. Scope

This test procedure is intended for use with gloves of all construction and materials.

3. Principle

3.1 The beneficial contribution of electrical conductivity to the dissipation of static charges generated by persons using gloves in ESD control work functions has long been recognized. Gloves with reasonable conductivity across the surface and to the hand help keep static charges to a minimum. However, conductivity is not sufficient to characterize the ESD performance of a glove for work with all products and materials.

3.2 When gloves have a reasonable conductivity they typically will keep to a minimum the static charges on conductive materials which are being handled. When insulative materials such as plastic IC packages and fiberglass substrates are handled, many gloves - even though conductive - impart high static charges through triboelectric effects.

3.3 This test procedure characterizes gloves for their electrostatic effects on most products.

4. Safety Precautions

4.1 Note: these safety precautions are for information purposes only. The precautions are ancillary to the testing procedures and are not intended to be all inclusive. It is the users responsibility to use safe and proper techniques in handling materials in this test method. Manufacturers MUST be consulted for specific details such as material safety data sheets and other manufacturers recommendations. All OSHA standards and rules must also be consulted and followed.

4.2 Where electrical instrumentation is required, all manufacturers' recommendations for safety must be adhered to as well as all applicable electrical codes of practice. If test personnel are not familiar with safety precautions, a competent electrical technician or electrician must be consulted.

5. Apparatus and Materials

5.1 Test area: Standard test conditions for this test method require a room or large enclosure which can be maintained at 22 +/- 2 C and at a relative humidity of 12 +/- 3 % and suitable means for monitoring these conditions. Special requirements of end use may dictate the use of other testing conditions. Audit measurements shall be at the recorded ambient conditions during the tests.

5.2 Ohmmeter: Electrical resistance measurement instrumentation capable of reading the expected range of resistances. Typically this range for static protective gloves should be between 10 kilo Ohms and 100 Gig Ohms. The electrical resistance measuring instrument should have a regulated output voltage capability of ten (10) to 100 volts. Ten (10) volts should be used for more conductive gloves and 100 volts for the more resistive gloves.

5.3 Resistance Electrodes: Two cylindrical 2.3 kg metal electrodes with a diameter of 63.5 mm each having contacts of electrically conductive elastomeric material with a thickness of approximately 6.35 mm and Shore-A (IRHD) durometer hardness of approximately 50. The resistance between the two electrodes should be less than 100 k Ohms when measured at 10 volts on a conductive metal surface. Standard electrodes constructed in accordance with NFPA 99 and ASTM F-150 may be modified to achieve these characteristics. A surface that has a point-to-point resistance of greater than 1.0 Tera Ohms shall be used as the specimen support surface for all resistance measurements except those involving the human hand.

5.4 Charged Plate Monitor: The charged plate monitor shall have an aluminum plate approximately 7 cm by 12 cm with a total capacitance of approximately 15 picofarads. The charged plate monitor shall be capable of measuring 2,000 volts, +/- 10%.

5.5 Faraday Cup & Coulomb Meter: The Coulomb meter shall be capable of measuring 200 nano Coulombs, +/- 10%. The Faraday cup shall be able to receive the specimen under test inside the cup with a minimum of 25 mm distance to the top of the cup.

5.6 Triboelectric Test Material: For this procedure the material chosen to represent the tribocharging propensity for gloves is a 26 mm X 26 mm BGA (ball grid array) IC which is composed of an epoxy IC package on a fiberglass and metal contact substrate. Special requirements may dictate the use of other materials.

5.7 Wrist Strap: A standard fabric style wrist strap connected directly to the resistance measurement instrument.

5.8 Air Ionizer: A forced air high voltage ionizer with an imbalance of less than +/- 1 volt.

6. Test Specimens

A minimum of 6 glove samples should be tested after being chosen by a valid sampling procedure.

7. Conditioning of Specimens

7.1 All test gloves shall be preconditioned at 22 +/- 2 C and at a relative humidity of 12 +/- 3% for a period of at least 48 hours.

7.2 Gloves being audited while in use may tested at ambient conditions.

8. Test Procedures

8.1 Resistance - Palm to Fingers

8.1a Place the glove under test on the insulative support. Position one electrode on the inside palm portion of the glove and the other electrode on the thumb of the glove.

8.1b Record the resistance reading.

8.1c Leaving the first electrode on the palm of the glove reposition the second electrode on each finger of the glove separately. Record the resistance readings of each finger.

8.1d Repeat the above procedure for all six glove specimens.

8.2 Resistance - Finger to Body

8.2a This test procedure shall be measured at 10 volts.

8.2b Place the glove under test on the technician's hand of preference. Attach the ungrounded wrist strap to the wrist of the gloved hand. Attach a wrist strap lead to the resistance meter. Make sure the wrist strap makes a good connection with the skin. Lotions may be used to assure good connection. Do not contaminate the glove with the wrist lotion.

8.2c Attach one electrode to the other terminal of the resistance meter. Press the index finger of the gloved hand against the conductive rubber of the electrode.

8.2d Record the resistance reading between the electrode being touched by the gloved hand and the wrist.

8.2e Repeat the above procedure for all five fingers.

8.2e Repeat the above procedure for all six glove specimens.

8.3 Resistance - Palm to Body

8.3a This test procedure shall be measured at 10 volts.

8.3b Place the glove under test on the technician's hand of preference. Attach the ungrounded wrist strap to the wrist of the gloved hand. Attach a wrist strap lead to the resistance meter. Make sure the wrist strap makes a good connection with the skin. Lotions may be used to assure good connection. Do not contaminate the glove with the wrist lotion

8.3c Attach one electrode to the other terminal of the resistance meter. Pick up and grasp the electrode with the gloved hand.

8.3d Record the resistance reading between the electrode being grasped by the gloved hand and the wrist.

8.3e Repeat the above procedure for all six glove specimens.

8.4 Triboelectric Charge Generation - Charged Plate

8.4a Place the glove under test on the technician's hand of preference. Attach the grounded wrist strap to the wrist of the gloved hand. Make sure the wrist strap makes a good connection with the skin. Lotions may be used to assure good connection. Do not contaminate the glove with the wrist lotion.

8.4b With the gloved hand stroke the aluminum plate vigorously five (5) times without lifting the gloved hand and as the last stroke is complete, extremely quickly remove the gloved hand from the aluminum plate.

8.4c Record the voltage readings.

8.4d Repeat the above procedure for all six glove specimens.

8.5 Triboelectric Charge Generation - Faraday Cup

8.5a Place the glove under test on the technician's hand of preference. Attach the grounded wrist strap to the wrist of the gloved hand. Make sure the wrist strap makes a good connection with the skin. Lotions may be used to assure good connection. Do not contaminate the glove with the wrist lotion.

8.5b Clean the BGA triboelectric sample with Isopropyl alcohol. Dry the BGA sample and gloved hand under the air stream of the air ionizer. Zero the Faraday cup.

8.5c With the gloved hand hold the BGA sample between the thumb and forefinger. Rub the BGA sample five (5) times with the thumb and forefinger and as the last rub is complete, quickly drop the BGA sample into the Faraday cup.

8.5d Record the Coulomb readings.

8.5e Repeat the above procedures for all six glove specimens. Neutralize the BGA sample and gloved hand under the air stream of the ionizer between each test.

9. Audit Test Procedures

The above tests may be performed on gloves in use in the field under the ambient conditions of the work areas. The results may of course be only used as a comparison since the ambient conditions may be favorable or not to any particular style of glove.

10. Report of Data

  • Report all readings .
  • Report the average of all sets of readings.
  • Report the date, time, humidity and temperature of the tests.
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